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Hampton Terrace Innkeeper Blog: Deals and Things to Do in Lenox and the Berkshires

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Berkshire Restaurants: Frankie’s Ristorante Italiano Re-discovered

  
  
  

frankies.707 At Hampton Terrace we want to make sure that our guests have the best possible dining experience. Most are here just a couple of nights, and considering the hundreds of choices in the Berkshires, the chance of accidently making the perfect choice is small. So we help the process along.

We have hosted over 35,000 guest nights here at the inn. The #1 topic at breakfast among our guests is a comparison of their dinners during their stay. So we hear a lot. And we have personally experienced most of the restaurants ourselves. The list of preferred places has always included Bistro Zinc, Pearl’s in Great Barrington, Fin and Betty’s Pizza in Lenox. All were created by the same ownership group over the past ten years, so it is safe to say they know what they are doing. We send a list of our "preferred" restaurants to our guests prior to their arrival, so that if they want to make reservations somewhere they can. Or if not, at least they arrive in the area with some ideas, and then they can look at the menu book in our front hall.

Last summer this group opened Frankie’s. It debuted right as the summer rush began, and we tried them twice, several months apart. Our experiences were not memorable. Plus, some of the guest feedback was pretty negative. So they did not make our list. There really ARE a lot of good Italian restaurants in the area.

But we saw positive reviews showing up on Trip Advisor recently. Occasionally some guests would end up there and report back that they liked the place. And then finally, we saw an ad that Frankie’s was running a winter 3-course price fix at $20. Remarkable enough for us to give it another try.

And I am glad we did. The special (Sunday-Thursday) includes soup or salad, a choice from about 10 entres, and either canolli or Tiramisu. I had the mushroom soup. Great. Susan had the Chicken Picata…and said it was the best she had ever eaten. Large, soft chicken chunks instead of tough hammered flat pieces…and a lemon/caper sauce that we mopped up with our bread to keep from losing any. I had the Spaghetti alla Carbonara. Perfect. We had to take our deserts to go….as the entres were normal size. You know how it is sometimes on these "teaser" price fix promotions….choice of 3 entres’ that are 40% smaller than a full price serving. Not this.

And we are normally VERY picky about wine choices. In this case, we had had some before leaving our house so a glass each was all we needed. And usually when we have to settle for wine-by-the-glass, we are not overwhelmed. In this case, I had a fine glass of house Chianti for $5, and Susan was happy with her white at $6.

So as of now, Frankie’s is on our list and we appreciate their giving us an "introductory" opportunity to come in on the cheap and give it another whirl. So for those of you coming to Hampton Terrace mid-week this winter, go check this out. And even if you are visiting us on a weekend, the normal menu prices should not deter you.

New England Romantic Getaways: Photography Key to Good Website

  
  
  

CH Common Room JR When we bought Hampton Terrace in 1999, we took some pictures. My sister-in-law’s college-age brother was majoring in photography, so we took some more. Soon after the renovation of the carriage house, a guy walked in the front door with a camera and a business card, so we added a few of his to the mix. Three years ago, we had about a thirty minute opportunity to shoot our newly constructed king suites….the space of time between getting our certificate of occupancy and our first guests checking in. I took the digital camera out there…and you know what comes next…

Many people have complimented us on our website over the years….but I always felt that our photographs undersold the property. They were small, dark, and taken in an era when it was fashionable to put a wide angle lense on your camera, stand in the corner on a stool, and try to capture as much of the room as possible.

So last Spring, we were very lucky to host Marti Mayne overnight. Marti is a well-known inn publicist, who does the same for the BedandBreakfast.com website. Before staying here, she had, of course, seen our inn on the web….and when she told us that our photos had to go……it was the final small push I needed to make the commitment to good inn photography.

She recommended Mark and Matthew of Jumping Rocks Photography in Philadelphia, two guys who had their own inn at one point. The photography at their Woolverton Inn was so spectacular, that they were asked to shoot other inns. Ultimately, they sold their interest in the Woolverton, and now they live on the road…having now photographed literally hundreds of the most historic and prominent inns in the country. There is a several year wait for their services, but a call from Marti on our behalf resulted in our being plugged into a cancellation spot six months later.

If you have run across this blog entry somewhere on the Internet, then I encourage you to hit "Hampton Terrace Home" on the link above and marvel at the pictures these guys took. They were here about three days, and put in long hours. Each room was tackled as a separate challenge….finding the right angle, setting up the lighting, and then placing a book here…a vase there…to invite the viewer into the frame. From my point of view, there was not a single photo in the collection that did not maximize its subject and end up somewhere on our redesigned website.

So thank you Mark and Matthew. Your reputation is well deserved. And an added bonus to us for the experience: we actually see our home now from a renewed perspective. Over the past ten years, as we have hosted, entertained and fed tens of thousands of guests….as we have routinely performed the housekeeping, the maintenance and the business details….we had begun to take for granted the crystal sconces in the living room, the carousel horse, the color of the main hallway yellow….. As many of you know….picking the right yellow can be very important and "haystack" was the result of two dozen yellow cards taped on the wall. As we followed Matthew and Mark around the inn and heard them effuse about how to capture this detail or that…. I developed a fresh sense of pride in Hampton Terrace.

And without a doubt, that new appreciation has been reflected in the names we have chosen for our guest rooms. Even though Hampton Terrace has been an inn since 1937, no one had bothered to name the rooms. It has been suggested to us many times that naming rooms would be important (I never really thought it was myself). But after my rediscovery of the house’s details and my heightened appreciation for the people who placed a sconce here, a fireplace there…..the names of the rooms came easily. My last fourteen blog entries cover each room and why we named each.

Enjoy our new photography on this website. Then allow us to fulfil Mark and Matthew’s intention of inviting you into the photo, by inviting you into our inn itself.

New England Inn: Marion Slocomb Suite

  
  
  

King Suite 3, small JR.jpg After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…King Suite 3 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.   Our Main House Rooms have been named after pre-inn owners of the property.   Our Wynnstay Cottage Rooms are named after the famous race horses owned by the Bonner family, who lived here from 1917-1937 and gave us the name Hampton Terrace.  We have decided to name our king suites after strong women from our family.

The Marion Slocumb Suite

MarionSlocombSM.jpg

Marion Slocomb (Winborn) 1911-1979. We dedicate this room to Susan’s maternal grandmother Marion Slocumb. Marion was a fiesty, Southern redhead, married to Magruder Winborn. They ran a lumber and hamper mill in Lumberton, Alabama. Later, they moved to Poplarville, Mississippi, where Susan, her mother and siblings lived with their grandmother while her father was stationed in Korea with the Army. The Slocombs lived for a century in the South, but when Susan and I moved to Massachusetts in 1999, we were returning to her roots. The Slocombs had a home in Sutton, Massachusetts in 1640, just twenty years after the Mayflower. And in 1691, John Winborn married Elizabeth Hart of Salem, who ultimately, at age 70, became one of the most famous of the accused "Salem witches" and spent seven months in prison. Winborn’s ancestors were Montegues who came to Virginia in 1635.

Ideal for Girlfriend Getaways or Families

Traveling with friends? Or family? Do you need an extra bed?

All our spacious King Suites provide room to relax. In addition to huge four-poster king bed, the living room has an overstuffed couch that converts to a second bed. Friends find it easy to socialize. Grab snacks from the refrigerator. Mix a favorite drink at the wet bar. Cozy up to the gas fireplace. Enjoy!

New England Inn: Rosalyn Elkan Suite

  
  
  

King Suite 2, small JR.jpg After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…King Suite 2 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.   Our Main House Rooms have been named after pre-inn owners of the property.   Our Wynnstay Cottage Rooms are named after the famous race horses owned by the Bonner family, who lived here from 1917-1937 and gave us the name Hampton Terrace.  We have decided to name our king suites after strong women from our family.

The Rosalyn Elkan Suite

RosalynElkan001SM.jpg

The 1929 Steinway in our living room has great significance. It was a wedding present from Stan’s great-grandfather, Eli Elkan to his new daughter-in-law in 1929. Rosalyn, an opera major at Indiana State, moved to Macon, GA and over three quarters of a century was the unquestioned Grand Dame of classical music in Macon. Founder of the Macon Concert Association and a co-founder of the Macon Symphony, she also was on the National Council of the Metropolitan Opera and knew all of the major classical music names of the day. Many would stay at, or be entertained in her home while traveling through the South and that list included Robert Merrill, Claudio Arrau, Marilyn Horne, Roberta Peters, Jerome Hines, Artur Rubenstein, Isaac Stern, Itzhak Perlman, Richard Tucker, Emanuel Ax, and Arthur Fiedler. She and her husband, Stanley traveled extensively throughout the world from the 1930s through the 1970s, with many of those trips lasting months. Rosalyn lived until her mid-90s.

Ideal Romantic Getaway or Anniversary

Treat yourself and someone special to the best!   Our King Suites are provide a romantic escape any time of the year. Private, spacious and beautifully appointed, they feature a fireplace and the largest 2-person corner Jacuzzi we could find. The King bed is so plush and soft, you may never want to leave.
Relax in your living room area (not a separate room) with an overstuffed couch (can be converted into a bed), romantic gas fireplace, wet bar and refrigerator.

The suite also features a television with built-in DVD and a beautiful, gold hand-ragged luxurious private bath. Your personal entrance and sitting porch overlook our outdoor, heated pool.

New England Inn: Pearl Davis Suite

  
  
  

King Suite 1 JR small.jpg After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…King Suite 1 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.   Our Main House Rooms have been named after pre-inn owners of the property.   Our Wynnstay Cottage Rooms are named after the famous race horses owned by the Bonner family, who lived here from 1917-1937 and gave us the name Hampton Terrace.  We have decided to name our king suites after strong women from our family.

The Pearl Davis Suite

PearlDavisSM.jpgPearl Davis (Hill), Susan’s paternal great grandmother, whose portrait hangs in our living room, was born in 1881 in rural upper Mississippi. She was known as one of the most beautiful women in the state, but when she chose to marry Ed Hill, her parents said they would rather see her in a casket than marry that scoundrel. When Ed came to take Pearl away in a wagon, her father followed them with a shotgun to make sure that they indeed had a legal ceremony. Pearl and Ed had five children but she died in 1919 at age 38, five months after having Ed Hill Pearlie Lucille. During their marriage Ed was well-known for the quality of his moonshine and he was considered one of the two most notorious bootleggers in Texas, ultimately being turned in by his rival. It took six Texas Rangers to haul him in. We have a touching letter he wrote in 1920 from prison to his infant daughter, apologizing for having to leave her. In the letter, he describes Pearl as a "perfect lady." Our granddaughter has been named Emily Pearl Vining.

Our King Suites represent the best of Hampton Terrace. Private, spacious and beautifully appointed, they feature your own personal entrance and sitting porch next to our outdoor, heated pool. Relax in your living room area (not a separate room) with an overstuffed couch (can be converted into a bed), romantic gas fireplace, large 2-person corner Jacuzzi (the largest we could find!) wet bar and refrigerator.

You will have a hard time leaving your huge four-poster king bed each morning. The suite also features a television with built-in DVD and a beautiful, gold hand-ragged luxurious private bath.

New England Inn, Lenox Lodging: Peerless Room

  
  
  
Carriage House 6, small, JR.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 6 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine

Peerless Room

Peerless

The dam of Dexter was by American Star, as were a good many fast trotters, the best of which was Peerless, a gray mare, foaled in 1853. Hiram Woodruff, the best trainer of his day, said she was the fastest animal that he or any other man ever drove to a wagon, and that he drove her a quarter in 30s and a mile in 2:23.

Hand-ragged in a warm and embracing "melon". This second-story, front-facing corner room features an antique iron queen-size bed with fluffy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player, and private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 18ft. x 15 ft.( including bath)

New England Inn, Lenox Lodging, Sunol Room

  
  
  
Carriage House 5, small JR_1.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 5 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

Sunol Room

Sunol

"Sunol is enough to awaken enthusiasm in any man and Mr. Bonner can be well excused the display of a large amount of it, for there is hardly a more thorough horseman in his way than he. To own the two fastest mares in the world is of course a great pleasure. To be the absolute director of their fortunes is another, and that is what Mr. Bonner is from this time on. Sunol cost Mr. Bonner about $41,000, and she declared her first dividend for him yesterday about noon." New York Times December 11, 1891.  World Record set in 1891: 2:08 1/4 beating Maud S.

You’ll love this color of blue/green! A soul-soothing upstairs room featuring a queen bed with fluffy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and a private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 18ft. x 15 ft.( including bath)

New England Inn: Sunol Room at Lenox Inn Hampton Terrace

  
  
  

Carriage House 5, small JR 1 After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names. It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 5 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

Sunol Room

sunolTHB

"Sunol is enough to awaken enthusiasm in any man and Mr. Bonner can be well excused the display of a large amount of it, for there is hardly a more thorough horseman in his way than he. To own the two fastest mares in the world is of course a great pleasure. To be the absolute director of their fortunes is another, and that is what Mr. Bonner is from this time on. Sunol cost Mr. Bonner about $41,000, and she declared her first dividend for him yesterday about noon." New York Times December 11, 1891. World Record set in 1891: 2:08 1/4 beating Maud S.

You’ll love this color of blue/green! A soul-soothing upstairs room featuring a queen bed with fluffy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and a private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub. Total Room Size: 18ft. x 15 ft.( including bath)

New England Inn, Lenox lodging: Rarus Room

  
  
  
Carriage House 5, small JR.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 1 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

Rarus

Rarus Room

"The Great Fatherless Trotter Stabled with Noble Companions.  …Mr. Bonner paid more for Rarus ($36,000) than he has ever paid for a trotter before, save Pocahantas. Rarus attracts more attention than he otherwise would from the fact that he is without pedigree." New York Times, 1879. In typical Bonner fashion, the purchase was a surprise headline. The day before, Rarus had been a no-show in Hartford, disappointing 15,000 fans and earning a lifetime ban from racing. It turned out that his owner, hoping to sell his horse that day, had been in negotiation with a buyer, who, wanting to protect his investment, refused to let the horse run. Mr. Bonner, desiring to save the horse’s reputation, and fulfilling his wish that all champions be allowed to retire with dignity, paid an unjustifiable fee to add the horse to his stables.  Broke world record twice: 2:14 and 2:13 1/4 in 1878

This dark, romantic room features the colors of nature – a queen bed with down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 17ft. x 15 ft.( including bath).

New England Lodging: Pocahontas, Lenox inn

  
  
  
Carriage House 3, small JR.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 3 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

Pocahontas

Pocahontas Room

The world record as the fastest horse in harness was held by the great pacing mare Pocahontas from 1855 to 1867. (record broken by Dexter) Born 1846, she sold for $30 that year, $51 in 1850 and $135 in 1852 as a sturdy horse who pulled logs in a four horse team. Her owner noticed she had unusual energy, and in 1853 she was entered in her first race in Cincinnati and won at 2:40. By the time Dexter passed her, she was setting records below 2:20. She foaled the famous racer Tom Rolfe and even won races with foal. Bought by Robert Bonner for $40,000, she ultimately ran an unofficial race of 2:08 3/4 in retirement, many years before that time was met officially.

A vintage-feeling room featuring a queen bed with cozy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and an exposed-brick private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 17ft. x 15 ft.( including bath)

New England Inn: Maud S. Hampton Terrace Lenox Inn

  
  
  
Carriage House 2, Small JR.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 2 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

Maud S.Maud S.

"Queen of the Turf," Maud S. was foaled in 1874 in Kentucky, a light-red chestnut. She was sold to Capt. George M. Stone in 1877 for $350. After trotting a mile in 2:17 1/2 at Lexington, KY in 1878, she was immediately bought by William H. Vanderbilt for $21,000. She was used as Vanderbilt’s roadhorse until 1884, when she was returned to the turf to lower the record to 2:10 and was sold to Robert Bonner for $40,000. It was well documented that Vanderbilt turned down $100,000 from a racing syndicate in order that his favorite and most famous horse spend the rest of her days in Bonner’s benevolent care. While in his stable she trotted her record mile in 2:08 3/4 at Cleveland, OH, this being the seventh time she had lowered the world record in six years. In 1885 she was permanently retired as a road horse and died on March 17, 1901, her obituary appearing on the front page of the New York Times. She is buried in Tarrytown, NY, next to the immortal, Dexter.

Broke world record seven times between 1880 and 1885, lowering it from
2:11 3/4  to 2:08 3/4. She retired with the record, which was subsequently lowered by Sunol, a Bonner horse.

This room features hand-ragged walls and a queen iron bed with fluffy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and private bath with 72" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 17ft. x 15 ft.( including bath)

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

New England Inn: Dexter Room, Hampton Terrace, Lenox inn

  
  
  
Carriage House 1 JR.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Wynnstay Cottage 1 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Since the 1920s, our sports heroes have swung bats, thrown touchdowns, or squared off in a ring. But prior to Henry Ford, when all local transportation involved a carriage and a horse the most idolized American heroes were those who could pull a carriage and its rider one mile down a track in as close to two minutes as possible.

In its day, this was Corvette verses GTO. Every town had a fair, and every fair had a race track. These horses, called "Trotters," were railed hundreds of thousands of miles to race legendary mares and stallions from other regions. Their names became as household as that of "the Babe."

Robert Bonner and his children (owners of Hampton Terrace from 1917-1937) were considered the premier Trotter owners in American history. The purest line begins with Hambletonian (1849-1876), who sired many of the Bonner’s most prized horses, and even Hambletonian spent his final years under Mr. Bonner’s expert and benevolent care.

"It is said that with the exception of General Grant and P. T. Barnum, Robert Bonner is known to more people than any man in America."

Illustrated Weekly Magazine, 1897

The Dexter Room

Born 1858, "wild as a hawk and always coming to grief." But his speed was so great and trotting action so perfect that he was sold for $400 as an unbroken 4-year-old. Making his debut as a racehorse on May 4, 1864 he won in straight heats. In 1865, Dexter lost only once, to Lady Thorn. In 1866, he won 25 of 26 starts. The next year, he beat the great Goldsmith Maid and then won five successive races against Lady Thorn. On July 30, 1867, Dexter won in 2:19, thereby setting the world record, which was previously 2:19-3/4 set by Flora Temple in 1859. Two weeks later, he trotted 2:17-1/4 in Buffalo to further lower the record. After three more wins, he retired. Dexter was purchased in September 1867 by Robert Bonner for $35,000 and was Mr. Bonner’s favorite road horse. In 1868, pulling 319 pounds of wagon and driver, Dexter trotted a mile in 2:21-3/4, according to the New York Times. Dexter died April 21, 1888.

"Hurrah for Dexter! Long live the horse of the century!"   Scribner’s Magazine
Broke world record twice: 2:19 and 2:17 1/4 in 1867.

A warm, spacious room featuring a king bed with fluffy down comforter, gas-flame corner fireplace, television/VCR with cable, air conditioning in-season, CD player and private bath with 60" Jacuzzi whirlpool tub.  Total Room Size: 24 ft. x 15 ft. (including bath)

New England Inn: The Walker Mini-Suite, Hampton Terrace

  
  
  
main5.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Main House 5 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

William Walker Mini-Suite (prior to 1852)

Earliest recorded owner of this property, pre-dating 1852. Considering we are located on Walker Street, and that Lenox was quite rural in those days… could there be a connection?

This bright, cozy mini-suite consists of two side-by-side rooms and a bath. Encompassing the entire rear of the second floor, it has many windows but gives a sense of privacy. One bedroom has an heirloom iron bed with a down comforter and net canopy. Television/VCR. The other has a lovely iron day bed with down comforter. Both rooms display antiques and vintage fabric pillows and drapes. Original claw-foot tub with shower.  Air conditioning, iron and ironing board, hair dryer and bath amenity collection.

New England Inn: The Bel Air Room, Hampton Terrace, Lenox inn

  
  
  

Main 4 Hall.jpg

After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Main House 4 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Marion Rathbone Oliver "Bel Air" Room (1873-1896)

Bel Air

Captain Robert Shaw Oliver of Albany, and his wife Marion, constructed their home on this site in 1873 (replaced in 1896 by the Struthers’ "Wynnstay"). This room overlooks the site of the former "Bel Air" mansion, the home where Mrs. Oliver grew up. Unfortunately, Bel Air was destroyed by fire a century later. She was the niece of the Haggertys, the original owners of Ventfort Hall, which was moved across the street and renamed Bel Air when the Morgans constructed the current Ventfort Hall. Marion was also the daughter of William Rathbone, who constructed the first Wyndhurst mansion, now Cranwell Resort.

Rich, deep and red. This dramatic room is a King, featuring a down comforter and vintage throw pillows. Television/VCR. There is also a CD player with romantic classical CDs. In the bathroom, you will find our largest antique claw-foot tub with shower. Air conditioning, iron and ironing board, hair dryer and bath amenity collection.

New England Inn: The Struthers Room, Hampton Terrace, a Lenox inn

  
  
  
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After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Main House 3 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Virginia Bird Struthers Room (1896-1917)

John and Virginia Bird Struthers bought this property in 1896 and built the current home in 1897, which they called "Wynnstay." Virginia’s father, Thomas Jefferson Bird owned and captained the Universe, a New York to Liverpool ocean liner. John Struthers owned William Struthers & Company, a third generation marble and contracting business in Philadelphia, whose commissions included the United States Mint, George Washington’s sarcophagus and most of Philadelphia’s most important monuments, including The Merchant’s Exchange, the Philadelphia Exchange, The Pennsylvania & Reading Railroad Building, and the Mechanic’s Bank.

Celebrate a romantic occasion in beautiful King room with a view. The colors of the sunset welcome you when you enter this elegant corner room. A high mattress king with white down comforter adds a plush touch. A beautiful fireplace, along with antiques and vintage fabrics complete the mood. From the front window, look down on historic Trinity Church. The bathroom features an antique claw-foot tub with shower. Television/VCR. CD player with romantic classical CDs. Air conditioning, iron and ironing board, hair dryer and bath amenity collection.

New England Inn: The Bonner Room, Hampton Terrace Lenox inn

  
  
  
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After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Main House 2 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

Kate d’Anterroches Bonner Room
(1917-1937)

Robert Bonner

Older Lenox residents remember Kate d’A Bonner to be the cream of Lenox society in the 1920s and 30s. Her parents, Robert "Ed" Bonner, Jr. and Kate d’A Griffith Bonner inherited the New York Ledger, NYC’s largest weekly newspaper, which was founded by her grandfather, Robert Bonner, an Irish immigrant. They purchased this home, Wynnstay, in 1917 from the Struthers. It was renamed after one of their sons, Hampton, and then given to Kate in 1920. The maternal side of the family is French and directly descended from General Lafayette.

This large front corner room is the original master bedroom and has a king bed and fireplace. Antiques and vintage fabrics, along with down comforters and warm peach walls create a peaceful haven. The view from the windows is of the beautiful and historic Trinity Church. The bath is oversized, featuring a walk-in shower. Television/VCR. CD player with romantic classical CDs. Air conditioning, iron and ironing board, hair dryer and bath amenity collection.

New England Inn: The Spencer Room, Hampton Terrace Lenox inn

  
  
  
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After more than 60 years operating as an inn, Hampton Terrace’s guest rooms finally have names.   It is not that they needed names…Main House 1 was pretty descriptive…but we decided that this was an opportunity to help tell the history of the property in a colorful way.

EDMUND SPENCER ROOM (1852-1873)

Earliest records for this property show that the first home was built by Edmund Spencer (1826-1894), a harness maker in 1852. It was replaced by R. S. Oliver in 1873. Mr. Spencer is buried in Lenox at the Church on the Hill cemetery.

A "romantic" room, featuring a lovely queen size white iron bed with a net canopy. Fluffy down comforter and vintage throw pillows along with antique furniture complete this room’s special ambiance. This corner room includes leaded glass windows, television/VCR, a fireplace and CD player with romantic classical CDs. Enjoy a 72" Ultra Spa Tub in the new bathroom.  Air conditioning, iron and ironing board, hair dryer and bath amenity collection.

New Website Now On-Line for Hampton Terrace in Lenox

  
  
  
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Hampton Terrace Bed and Breakfast in Lenox has uploaded a completely redesigned website featuring incredible photographs by Matthew and Mark of Jumping Rocks Photography from Philadelphia.   The site was re-created by Kathy Barto of KMB Designs from Boulder Colorado, and is being search engine optimized by Bob O’Haver of Gray Matter Technology in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

The site also goes much further in describing Hampton Terrace’s place in Gilded Age history.   For the first time since becoming an inn in 1937, the guest rooms now have names, which place the property in historic context. 

Over the next several weeks of blog entries, I plan to feature a room each day.    Two things would be accomplished by this.    You can see Jumping Rock’s fabulous photos room by room…and also you would daily learn more about the owners of this property.   Or, CLICK HERE to see our website.

Hampton Terrace is the top-rated Lenox inn by members of Trip Advisor and features a Romantic Weekend Special from now until late June.    Please call us for your Berkshire lodging needs.

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